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4 Stunning Long Exposure Effects Explained

With the understanding of These 4 Stunning Long Exposure Effects And How To Remake Them, you can create stunning images easily, but it is a sophisticated skill in photography. You should have the basic understanding of the exposure time, triangle and shutter speed before studying this technique. In this post, I am going to discuss 4 effects by using long exposure, together with a practical step that you can accomplish.

As people always say, “Great tools will be the requirement for the successful execution of a project”, getting suitable gear for long exposure photography is vital.

Here is an inventory of what you may need:

  • Tripod – To maintain the stability of your camera so you have a sharp picture. (One of the best ones I use is Zomei Tripod, I really recommend it)
  • Timer – To time your exposure time. If you’re using more than 30 seconds (which is the automatic exposure time for nearly all of the cameras), then you will require a timer to time the length of time you have subjected. (Check it out here)
  • ND filter – To reduce mild entering your camera. I have just published a guide on how to pick the ND filter.
  • Shutter cable – To release the shutter. This isn’t a equipment but highly recommended.
  • Non-slippery Shoes – To protect against slipping on the wet stones while shooting water drops.

4 Stunning Long Exposure Effects Explained:

Long Exposure Effect 1: Cloud Movement

When you stare at the skies for a while, you might observe that the clouds are moving very slowly. You’ll need an exposure time of 30 seconds, to catch the moving clouds.1 to 2 minutes will do the very best job of shooting the cloud motion.

To accomplish a very long exposure time, a quality ND filter is a must. Moreover, try not to aim for more than two minutes because hot pixels might start to appear and that can decrease your image quality.

Long Exposure Effect 1: catching the clouds
Long exposure tip number one is cloud movement! You’ll need an exposure time of 30 seconds, to catch the moving clouds.

How to Do the Shot

  1. Set your tripod up on a good location and shoot your picture.
  2. Switch to A-mode and set goal aperture, f/5.6-8 is advocated, and ISO.
  3. Meter and focus the shoot and take a test shoot to see whether it is any over or under-exposure. Mark down the exposure time if everything looks fine.
  4. Establish to M-mode and manual focus. Maintain aperture and ISO unchanged but alter the shutter to bulb.
  5. Put on the ND filter and compute the required exposure time. By 64, multiply the first exposure period for a 6-stop filter. If you’re currently using a filter, multiply 1000. Remember to aim for 1 to 2 minutes exposure time.
  6. Release the shutter and Await the Outcome.

Long Exposure Effect 2: Water Falls and Waves Movement

The next result a long exposure can perform well is a smooth water wave or fall. As shooting the cloud motion, apply the similar concept, however, you will require a shorter timeframe for it. 2 to 10 seconds is the ideal exposure time through my expertise.

Should you take on a cloudy day, you might have a shutter speed that is slow enough for the job done. But, try not to stop down the aperture to smaller compared to f/16 otherwise, your picture will be blurred by the diffraction effect.

Long Exposure Effect 2: water photography advice
As shooting the cloud motion, apply the similar concept, however, you will require a shorter timeframe for it. 2 to 10 seconds is the ideal exposure time through my expertise.

How to Do the Shot

  1. Follow step 1 to step 4 to the cloud movement tutorial.
  2. Wear an ND filter. 6-stop or even 3-stop filter is suggested for shooting waterfalls.
  3. Calculate the required shutter speed. For a 3-stop filter, then you have to multiply regular shutter speed by 8, whereas 64 for a 6-stop filter.
  4. Release the shutter.

Long Exposure Effect 3: Experiment with Exposure Time

If you are living in a large city, like me in Hong Kong, then you might find a chance to catch different sorts of beams. Vehicles’ headlight would produce a perfect shooter. Among all sorts of cars, my favorite is that the ray from the buses or trams.

Different from the first two cases, you are only going to require a nude lens for this sort of photos. When you are shooting mind the lights of cars. Only by experimenting with aperture and exposure time you can achieve amazing results. If you would like to

4 Stunning Long Exposure Effects Explained: City lights
Long exposure street photography advice, catching the lights in the city streets.

How to Do the Shot

  1. Examine the traffic. You have to know where they’re going and where the cars come from. Not only does it help to capture a shot, but also capture in a site that is secure.
  2. Set up your tripod and camera. You’ve got to be careful not to remain too close to the road because high-speed vehicles create pressure which may inadvertently drag you.
  3. Use A-mode to meter the camera speed to the shoot. Establish an aperture of f/5.6 to 8 because it will provide you the sharpest image.
  4. Require a test shoot with the background just. Make certain there’s no over or under-exposure. Place it to M-mode, if everything is fine and fix the shutter speed.
  5. Wait until your target car comes and release the shutter.

Long Exposure Effect 4: Panning – Experiments With Shutter Speed

Panning is the technique which uses a slow shutter speed to follow a topic. It may be a racing vehicle or bike, a group of birds, a running horse, etc.. Among these 4 tactics, panning is easily the toughest to master. For beginners to get images that are blurred can’t even be seen, to put it differently, it isn’t surprising.

When performing panning, distinct subjects have gap goal shutter speed. For example, 1/200 into 1/100 second is relatively slow to take flying birds; 1/50 to 1/30 is a fantastic range to pan formulation one or horse racing. When you are shooting on a new subject, you might need to spend some time.

By the way, a tripod isn’t crucial on panning. Since you do not have to carry the heavy tripod all day shooting provides you more freedom.

4 Stunning Long Exposure Effects Explained: How to do panning photography techniques the right way
Panning is the technique which uses a slow shutter speed to follow a topic. It may be a racing vehicle or bike, a group of birds, a running horse, etc.. Among these 4 tactics, panning is easily the toughest to master.

How to Do the Shot

  1. Set it into S-mode, constant focus mode, 3D tracking and also spot metering.
  2. Set the goal shutter speed.
  3. Focus on the Topic.
  4. Hold down the shutter while tracing the subject from the viewfinder.
  5. Repeat the above until you capture the image you want. I get two or 1 sharp picture per 100 shoots for panning birds. Be patient and only try again.

So, guys, I hope you enjoy my brief tutorial and find it helpful. These skills may not simple to master, but once you can afford them, you will find that taking stunning photos are easier than you think.

When you master them I have a couple of other great articles for you to combine with this knowledge:

Happy shooting!

 

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